Support for LGBTQ foster youth: PDFs from non-profits we love

teruko nails. foster youthDownload these PDFs from various non-profit organizations that had budgets to generate research and support ideas.

 

Resources about LGBTQ Foster Youth

Out of the Margins
Woronoff, R., Estrada, R., & Sommer, S. (2006) Out of the Margins: A Report on Regional Listening Forums Highlighting the Experiences of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning Youth in Care. Report from the Child Welfare League of America, Washington, D.C.

Description: The CWLA/Lambda Regional Listening Forums provided an opportunity for LGBTQ youth in care, and the adults who work with and care for them, to share their experiences and to work together to identify strategies for bringing about lasting change within the child welfare system. More than 500 youth and adult participants from 22 states attended the Forums, offering personal stories of actual experiences and concrete solutions for building the capacity of the child welfare system to better meet the needs of LGBTQ young people in care. (Authors)

Download Out of the Margins HERE !

Getting Down to Basics: Toolkit to Support LGBTQ Youth in Care
Lambda Legal & Child Welfare League of America (CWLA) (2010). Getting Down to Basics: Toolkit to Support LGBTQ Youth in Care. Lambda Legal & Child Welfare League of America (CWLA), Washington, DC & New York, NY.

Description: Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (“LGBTQ”) young people are in America’s child welfare and juvenile justice systems in disproportionate numbers. Like all young people in care, they have the right to be safe and protected. All too often, however, they are misunderstood and mistreated, leading to an increased risk of negative outcomes. This tool kit offers practical tips and information to ensure that LGBTQ young people in care receive the support and services they deserve. Developed in partnership by the Child Welfare League of America (CWLA) and Lambda Legal, the tool kit gives guidance on an array of issues affecting LGBTQ youth and the adults and organizations who provide them with out-of-home care. (Authors)

Download Getting Down to Basics: Toolkit to Support LGBTQ Youth in Care HERE!

Incidence and Vulnerability of LGBTQ Homeless Youth (discusses experiences of foster youth at points)
National Alliance to End Homelessness (2008) Incidence and Vulnerability of LGBTQ Homeless Youth. Youth Homelessness Series Brief No 2. National Alliance to End Homelessness, Washington, DC.

Description: This report addresses the incidence of homelessness and homelessness risks among LGBTQ youth.

Content: Severe family conflict, abuse, neglect, and abandonment all contribute to family displacement and homelessness for lesbian,gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer/questioning (LGBTQ) youth in America. This issue brief offers an overview of research indicating that each year hundreds of thousands of LGBTQ youth will experience homelessness. This brief reviews research concerning LGBTQ homeless youth and offers suggestions for interventions with positive outcomes for homeless adolescents and young adults. (Authors).

Download Incidence and Vulnerability of LGBTQ Homeless Youth HERE!

Other Media about LGBTQ Foster Youth:

The Kids are Listening: LGBTQ Foster Youth (Video)
The Kids are Listening, American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law, & The Opening Doors Project. (2011). The Kids are Listening: LGBTQ Foster Youth (Video), Washington, DC.

Description: Youth who identify as LGBTQI2-S are over represented among youth who are homeless. They often face rejection as a result of their sexual identity. This can be particularly true for youth exiting the foster care system. This video, by the Opening Doors Project, seeks to raise awareness about the hate speech and discrimination these youth often face.

Content: This video is brought to you by the Opening Doors Project, through the American Bar Association Center on Children and Law. The Project works to make life better for lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans gender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth today. It is dedicated to training and supporting the legal and social service professionals on the front lines to ensure that LGBTQ foster youth have the support they deserve and the rights they demand. Through on-the-ground trainings, local task forces, and comprehensive research and training materials, the Opening Doors Project provides the legal community with advocacy tools they need to successfully represent LGBTQ youth in foster care. The project introduces this video stating, “Our kids are listening – whether it’s on the news, at home or in our schools and it’s up to us to make sure they hear the right things. Share this video with five friends and together we will stand up to hate speech and discrimination.” (Adapted from the authors).

Watch The Kids are Listening: LGBTQ Foster Youth (Video) HERE!

 

Resources about Foster Youth Generally:

Guide to Independent Living for Transitional-Age and Emancipated Foster Youth
Alameda County Court Appointed Special Advocates Program (ACCASA). (2010). Guide to Independent Living for Transitional-Age and Emancipated Foster Youth.  San Leandro, CA.

Description: This guidebook was created by the Alameda County Court Appointed Special Advocates program so that foster youth transitioning to independent living can have a thorough understanding of their legal rights and how to best utilize the resources available to them. In addition, this guide explains to Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASAs) how they can best assist the youth for whom they are serving as advocates to become independent and responsible adults. The vast majority of foster youth have encountered a great deal of challenges in life and need consistent and ongoing support to reach their potential. Through consistent mentoring and advocacy, these young people have a greater chance of avoiding homelessness, prison or being subjected to other poor outcomes.

Download Guide to Independent Living for Transitional-Age and Emancipated Foster Youth HERE !

Our Children: Emancipating Foster Youth, A Community Action Guide
League of California Cities, California State Association of Counties, & California School Boards Association. (2007) Our Children: Emancipating Foster Youth, A Community Action Guide.

Download HERE !

 

Resources about LGBTQ Homeless Youth Generally:

A National Approach to Meeting the Needs of LGBTQ Homeless Youth
National Alliance to End Homelessness (NAEH) (2009) A National Approach to Meeting the Needs of LGBTQ Homeless Youth.  National Alliance to End Homelessness (NAEH), Washington, DC.

Description: This two-page fact sheet provides an overview of the prevalence and experience of LGBTQ youth, causal factors, and risks to LGBTQ youth while homeless. It also highlights a reform agenda to end homelessness for LGBTQ youth, which includes:
•    Broadening community awareness of the prevalence and causes of homelessness for LGBTQ youth;
•    Engage LGBTQ adults and allies in building local advocacy networks to expand services, shelter, and housing for LGBTQ homeless youth;
•    Secure increased public investment from local, state, and federal government in services, shelter, and housing for homeless LGBTQ youth; and
•    Improve the cultural competency of local services, shelter, and housing to meet the needs of LGBTQ homeless youth.
The brief also makes the following best practice recommendations for:,
•    Youth-serving professionals, case workers, and advocates
•    Administrators and supervisors
•    Improving residential services
(Adapted from the authors).

Download A National Approach to Meeting the Needs of LGBTQ Homeless Youth HERE!

 Resources about LGBTQ Youth Generally:

HRC Webcast Resources: The First Step is an Open Mind: Best Practices for Working with LGBTQ Youth.
Hooks-Wayman, R. & Siciliano, C. (2009). HRC Webcast Resources: The First Step is an Open Mind: Best Practices for Working with LGBTQ Youth.

Description: This FREE HRC webcast, which aired on May 27, 2009, provided an overview of the issues that LGBTQ youth face. The presenters discussed the best practice recommendations recently released by NAEH and implementation of these practices at the Ali Forney Center in New York City.

Content: This webcast featured Richard Hooks-Wayman of the National Alliance to End Homelessness (NAEH) and Carl Siciliano of The Ali Forney Center, the nation’s largest and most comprehensive organization dedicated to youth who are homeless and Lesbian, Gay Bisexual, Transgender, or Questioning (LGBTQ). Richard and Carl provided an overview of the issues that these youth face. They also discussed the best practice recommendations recently released by NAEH and implementation of these practices at the Ali Forney Center.

Download the transcript HERE !
Listen to a podcast from the presentation HERE !

 

 

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